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Manufactured by O. F. Mossberg & Sons, Mossberg 500 is a series of pump-action shotguns, very much treasured for their reliability and value.

Popular Shotguns: Mossberg 500 Review

Popular Shotguns: Mossberg 500 ReviewManufactured by O.F. Mossberg & Sons, Mossberg 500 is a series of pump-action shotguns, very much treasured for their reliability and value. The fact that more than 10,000,000 of them have been manufactured in the last 50 years makes the Mossberg 500 one of the most respected shotguns out there. It has been nicknamed ‘Mossy’ and some say it’s so popular that every shooter owns, has owned or will own one at some point in their lives. The shotgun has been designed with a dual action bar. This particular feature was introduced in 1970, after the original single-action bar was reported to bind and break, making the gun unsafe and easily broken. It also has a single large locking lug, used to secure the breech. You can find the magazine tube located directly below the barrel, screwed into the receiver. On the left rear of the trigger bar you have the slide release and the safety, often called the “tang safety” is on the upper rear of the receiver. Given the fact that it was originally designed to be used in very harsh conditions, such as combat or hunting ducks or geese, so hunting near a water, one of its main design traits is easy cleaning and maintaining. Mossberg 500 Variants As far as variants go, the name “Mossberg 500” does not mean a single type of shotguns, but rather covers an entire range of guns, meant for 3 inch magnum shells. However, if we were to speak about the standard model, this one holds five 2.75 inch or four 3 inch shells in the magazine and another spare one in the chamber. It also comes in 12 and 20 gauge and .410 bore. Interestingly enough, at one point during its history, a 16 gauge was introduced, but was quickly discontinued. Here are the variants: Field models – basic sporting models available for purchase in a wide variety of finishes and lengths. They can be customized for hunting waterfowl, upland game, turkeys or for shooting slugs with the special slug barrel. Special purpose models – they are designed for self-defense and for military and police use. For example, the 590 and the eight-shot Model 500 are sold solely as special purpose shotguns. They all have short barrels, which are completely interchangeable with ones of the same length in the 500 branch. They also come with special designations, such as SPC, Mossberg 500 Tactical Persuader or Mossberg 500 Mariner. Law enforcement models – although they might sound the same as the special purpose models, they are different, in the sense that the former have heavier duty barrels, trigger guards, safeties and they will be a lot more resistant to hard use. These particular models are the 590A1s. They are sold in 12 gauge, with 18.5-inch and 28-inch barrels, Mossberg 500 pistol grip and sling. The Law Enforcement shotguns were also sold as a combo, with the same features. Home security models – this is the HS410 and it’s only available in .410. Also, as its named states, it has been specifically designed for defense usage. It is known to be the least powerful common shotgun, but users have reported it to be an amazing weapon nonetheless. It has been marketed towards beginners, who only want a weapon that’s simple and easy to use but effective at the same time. Also, an important mention is the fact that it’s sold with a training video about safety and usage. Apart from these variants, there are also some riot gun versions of the pistol grip 500, such as Mossberg 500 Persuader, Mossberg 500 Cruiser, Road Blocker and Mariner. They all come with an 18.5 inch and 20 inch barrel. It depends on the magazine capacity. One could also purchase the 500 Flex, which is basically your standard Mossberg 500 paired with the FLEX TLS tool-less locking system. Thusly, the shotgun turns into a very adaptable weapon, which allows the users to switch between different shooting applications in almost not time at all and with their bare hands. Another big hit with Mossberg fans was the 500 Chainsaw, also called “The Zombie Killer”. What differentiates it from all the other shotguns is the fact that is has a chainsaw top grip which allows the user much more muzzle control. It’s aimed for serious shooting and a plus is that you can easily remove the grip and transform it into a standard fore-end. Mossberg Accessories Mossberg also markets a wide array of tactical accessories, like stocks and barrels, which allow the user to make many combinations. In the past, they even offered a bullpup configured 500. If one buys the appropriate Mossberg 500 accessories, he or she can transform their favorite weapon into a field gun, a slug gun, a defensive weapon either for civilians, the police or military forces or even into a trap or skeet gun. The Mossberg 500 vs. Remington 870 Debate There has always been a debate centered around the Remington 870 vs Mossberg 500. People always seem to wonder if they should buy one or the other. Looking a bit into that debate, both guns are inexpensive, they have both seen action in the field, in battle and with the police. One difference would be the fact that the 870 is what’s called a “youth model”, given the fact that it has been most people’s first shotgun, used during hunting. Of course, there are pros and cons to both. People say the 870 is a subpar gun these days, with its makers no longer caring for quality, since it’s become such a household name. On the other hand, Mossberg 500 is a working device that is good for anything from squirrels to coyotes, but it’s very ugly to look at. The 870 is said to be too big, while the 500 won’t jam no matter what. One thing that I can tell you for sure regarding this debate is that, should you have any doubts about which one to choose, the best thing is to try them both out, rather than focusing on opinions expressed online. People are normally biased when it comes to their guns, have emotional attachments towards them and that might be misleading in the Mossberg 500 vs Remington 870 problem. Mossberg 500 is on sale for the price of under $500, which is one of the main reasons why it’s such a beloved weapon. Mossberg 500 Finish Regarding finishes, the Mossberg 500 has an anodized aluminum alloy receiver, with polished and blued barrels. There are also camouflage painted models, in different patterns, while stocks can be made either of wood or composite. There’s a Mariner model available as well, with a silver finish, highly resistant to corrosion and paired with black composite stocks,  which is called the Marinecote finish.

DIY: Making An Activated Charcoal Filter

DIY: Making An Activated Charcoal Filter

We’ve had a lot of rain up here lately.  A LOT of rain.  I was out puttering around the yard this week and I noticed the rain water slowly dripping through my raised fire pit and the wood coals it was full of.  Drip drip drip…… into a puddle below. Quick Navigation Do It Yourself More Info Do It Yourself That got me thinking, is that some kind of charcoal filter happening there?  What is the difference between a pile of wood charcoal and an activated charcoal filter?  Can I make an activated charcoal filter to filter water through for drinking? The first thing I learned when I started searching the answers to those questions, is that activated charcoal is in no way the same as burnt wood. Activated charcoal is charcoal that has been treated with oxygen to open up millions of tiny pores between the carbon atoms.  It’s a specialized manufacturing process, requiring temperatures in the 1000 degree F range. (Or really dangerous chemicals and temperatures in the 600 degree range.) Well, shoot.  There went my whole DIY activated charcoal plans.  What can I still do?  Make charcoal?   I’m quite the pyro, I burn a fair bit of wood.  How far will that get me towards a water filter? It turns out, that regular charcoal was used for water filtering for a long time before we figured out activated charcoal .  In its natural state it contains the atoms that neutralize odors and filter water.  Activated charcoal just has those atoms in larger quantities. (For those interested in such things, apparently activated charcoal made from coconut shells is better than that made from wood.) So regular charred wood will work.  Just not as well.  You can increase the amount of regular charcoal, or increase the contact time of the water to charcoal to make up for the lesser effectiveness.  And remember, there are specific ways to make good charcoal. Check this out. To recap here, I don’t think you can make your own Activated Charcoal, especially not for less than what you can find for it online.  And probably not safely, considering the temperatures involved.  But, if you want a DIY water filter, you can buy the Activated charcoal and DIY everything else.  You need to plan your filter to allow proper time for the AC to adsorb the contaminants, the water has to be in contact with the carbon filter for longer than a second.  You’ll also want a sediment filter before the activated charcoal filter, since they don’t work as well for the bigger particles.  Sediment filters can be fine sand or gravel.  The sediment filter will grab things like sand and rust particles.  Don’t send boiled water immediately through an AC filter, it works best at room temperature. Marineland Black Diamond Premium Activated Carbon 10 Ounces, Filter Media... FOR CHEMICAL aquarium FILTRATION "Black Diamond Premium" Activated Carbon removes odors discoloration... SPECIALLY FORMULATED Composed of heat-activated bituminous coal-based carbon See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-11 at 04:58 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API More Info Here’s a great PDF ( Click Here ) from my neighbors to the North, the North Dakota State University . “Filtration: Sediment, Activated Carbon and Mixed Media”  If you are looking for a good overview of your various DIY options for water filtration. They start with a good reminder to get your water tested so you KNOW for sure, exactly what kinds of things you’ll need to be filtering out.  No, this is not a service that will be available post grid crash .  Yes, you should get this done before that happens.  Then expect your water quality to get worse post-crash, not better. See Road Warrior’s post from SHTFBlog.com for one of the reasons why ( Click Here ). Think of your filtering needs as layers.  The sediment filter removes things like rust and sand.  The AC filter removes or reduces organics that can affect taste, odor and color, chlorine, trihalomethanes (THM), pesticides, industrial solvents (halogenated hydrocarbons), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).  A round of Ultraviolet (UV) treatment can be done quite simply with clear  1 L plastic water bottles set in the sun for a few hours.  UV will remove a lot of microorganisms that could make you sick, microorganisms that an AC filter won’t catch. Check out this doc ( Click Here ) for a great 101 on UV water treatment.  They’ve got a great chart on UV dosages required to kill a whole list of organisms, Bacteria, mold, viruses and yeasts. Remember to account for filter replacement.  If you want 3 months worth of water filtration, but your rate of water usage means you’ll need to replace the filter every 2 weeks, you’ll have to have 6 replacement filters on hand.  Your rate of water usage can be calculated by taking the Number of People x Average Daily Water Usage.  And remember to count your people correctly, will your son’s best friend who lives with a dead-beat dad be over every day?  Will your brother-in-law bring his family out to your place if the city loses water/power?  Your water usage number will be a gallons/day number.  Most filters will tell you how many gallons of water they can filter before cleaning or replacement is necessary.  So Filter Life divided by your Usage Rate will tell you how many days that filter will last at that rate. Keep that Usage Rate in mind when you are designing the system. Do you have a place to hold the needed water, before and after filtering?  If you know you’ll need 12 gallons a day, do you want to hold 6 at a time and filter twice a day? Or hold 24 gallons and filter once every 2 days? If you find you need some small parts, there are kits online with just those small parts that you can buy. Like this one . Emergency-H2O Emergency Silver Impregnated Ceramic Water Filter Kit 1 4X4 "Silver Impregnated Ceramic" Dome Water Filter 1 new cloth sock (10 microns) - 1 vinyl drip tube See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 06:08 / Affiliate links / Images from "Amazon Product Advertising" API What kinds of water purification do you have planned?  Anyone working on some DIY Filters?  The last time I made one was in high school, for an aquaculture class. It could be a good time to revisit that experience and see what I can whip up for my family.  Sound off in the comments below if you have ideas or actual plans that you’ve followed. Photos by: Brenda Price Calamity Jane James Moore Ryo Chijiiwa Save Save Other interesting articles: Hydroviv Water Filter Review for 2020: Survival Gear Hands-On Use Coffee Filters to Extend the Life of Your Water Filtration System LifeStraw vs Sawyer Mini Water Filter – Which is better for Survival? Expedient Family Survival Water Filter

Best Rimfire Scope: Reviewing the Top Rimfire Optics

Best Rimfire Scope: Reviewing the Top Rimfire Optics

Rimfire rifles remain a favorite of many hunters for taking on small game and varmints and are also great for plinking and target practice. Odds are that many of you out there probably learned to shoot on a classic .22 Long Rifle, as their light weight and little recoil makes them great for kids. Still, gone are the days when these were mostly considered as weapons only for kids, as nowadays the number of outstanding rimfire rifles and scopes on the market has made them more popular than ever. No matter what type of rimfire rifle you own and no matter what you use it for, adding a scope will definitely increase your accuracy. However, it isn’t as simple as attaching any old scope, as the best rimfire scope will have a couple of major differences that sets it apart from your standard centerfire scopes. In order to help you make a more informed decision about which scope is right for you, we will first provide you with our top 5 choices to save the suspense. Next we’ll look at the differences between rimfire and center scopes and what you need to know to choose the best product for your favorite rimfire scope firearms. Finally, we’ll then provide you with rimfire scope reviews for the top products on the market today. 5 Best Rimfire Scopes Rimfire vs. Centerfire Rifles You’re probably already familiar with the basic difference between rimfire and centerfire weapons as it relates to how the bullets are fired, so we’ll skip the technical details here as whether the firing pin strikes the center or the rim of the bullet is unimportant for our purposes. Instead, what is important is the difference in terms of distance and caliber. As the firing pin must crush the end of a rimfire bullet to ignite the primer, these bullets must be made of thinner metal than centerfire bullets and thus are limited to a maximum of .22 caliber. Obviously, a .22 caliber bullet won’t fly nearly as far or pack nearly as strong of a punch as more powerful weapons. As it relates to scopes, this difference generally means that centerfire scopes are designed to shoot at longer distances and, as such, are adjusted to be perfectly dialed starting somewhere around 150 to 200 yards. Try shooting at distances below this and suddenly your accuracy will be seriously diminished due to the parallax correction. Although you can easily shoot a .17 or .22 caliber magnum rimfire over 150 yards, this still doesn’t mean that you can just use any standard centerfire scope on it, as you’ll generally be shooting at shorter distances. In fact, even if you do planning on target or game shooting at these long distances, you’ll still be way better off picking up a scope that’s specially designed for rimfire rifles. For many years, the .22LR was virtually the only rimfire weapon available, but nowadays shooters can also choose from .17 caliber rimfires as well. As each rimfire weapon and ammo has its own unique shooting characteristics in terms of trajectory, velocity and distance, it’s important that you choose the right scope for that particular weapon and your own needs if you want to achieve the best, most accurate shooting results. Still, before we get into the best rimfire scope for each type of weapon, we’ll first look a bit more into the differences between rimfire and centerfire scopes to better illustrate why your standard centerfire scope is not the best for rimfire rifles. The Importance of Parallax Most centerfire scopes have a fixed parallax setting, which is usually set at around 150-200 yards. As you to start shooting at distances below the parallax correction, your shots will start to hit slightly to the side of the intended target, with the accuracy decreasing more and more the shorter the distance is. On the other hand, you’ll find parallax-free, adjustable parallax and fixed parallax rimfire scopes, all of which are designed to be much more accurate at these shorter distances. However, deciding which of the three options is right for you depends on a few different factors—namely, the type of rifle you’re using (.22LR, .22WMR, .17HMR, .17 Mach 2, etc.), the distance(s) you’ll be shooting/what you’re shooting at and of course, how much you’re willing to spend. When looking at rimfire scopes, you’ll generally find three different types of scopes as it concerns parallax: parallax free, fixed parallax and adjustable parallax. The most basic type of rimfire scope has parallax free sight, meaning that the scope hasn’t been adjusted to account for the slight difference in picture when looking it objects with one eye or the other. Without getting too technical, parallax correction basically means that the picture you see through the sight has been adjusted slightly to the side. The reason for this our brain makes a mental image based on what it sees through both eyes. As each eye sees a slightly different picture, the brain must quickly combine the two into one image. However, when you look at something with only one eye, as you do through a scope, the brain only gets one half of the picture. This means that your vision is actually shifted slightly to the side, with the result that your shot will be slightly to the side of where you thought you were aiming. In order to overcome this problem, many scopes feature parallax correction, where the scope is adjusted so as to basically shift the image back to where it actually is. However, when you’re shooting at short distances, parallax really isn’t that big of an issue, as the parallax error only becomes worse as you reach greater distances. When shooting at shorter distances, say less than 50 yards, the parallax problem will likely only cause your shot to be off by a tiny increment, which is why so many people choose parallax free rimfire scopes. That being said, over these distances, your shot will start to be a bit further and further off. While you can always just learn to adjust your shots, many people still prefer the added accuracy and so choose to spend the extra money on a fixed parallax scope. The majority of fixed parallax rimfire scopes will be adjusted to a distance of around 50 or 60 yards—providing much greater accuracy at the shorter distances you’ll typically be shooting. As rimfire scopes are designed specifically for these shorter distances, you’ll be able to accurately target most things within range without the need to constantly refocus the scope. However, parallax again begins to become a problem above these distances, meaning you’ll quickly start to lose accuracy until you figure out how to properly adjust for it. Of course, some people mainly use their rimfire rifles for longer distance shooting, especially .22WMRs. For this reason, the best scope for a .22 rimfire or a 17 caliber rimfire isn’t necessarily the best scope for a 22 magnum. The reason here is that you’ll likely need a higher level of magnification for shooting at these longer distances, which suddenly makes parallax much more important. Basically, the parallax-free and fixed parallax sights are designed only for close shooting. For this reason, you’ll probably want to choose a parallax-adjustable scope if you plan on doing both close and distance shooting, as this gives you the ability to readjust the parallax correction as you increase the magnification for longer distance shooting. Choosing the Right Level of Magnification As you’ll generally be shooting at quite short distances, many hunters find that 4x magnification is plenty strong enough to produce tightly grouped, accurate results. Not only that, but at these levels of magnification, parallax really isn’t an issue, which is why so many of the best 4x rimfire scopes are parallax free. Basically, a standard 4x scope will work well for most distances you’ll typically be shooting with a .22LR. While choosing a scope with an adjustable magnification will definitely give you more options, adjustable scopes are also typically more expensive, which is why so many people choose a basic 4x fixed scope for their standard small game and plinking rifles. On the other hand, if you’re shooting a .22WMR, you’ll probably be better off choosing a scope with adjustable magnification, as these rifles tend to shoot farther and with more velocity than the Long Rifle. As well, they also have a much flatter trajectory—as does the .17HMR— so the increased magnification will definitely help improve accuracy at longer distances with these rifles. All this being said, the level of magnification you’ll need depends on the distances you’ll typically be shooting and the size of the target you’re shooting at. So, if you plan on shooting small varmints at longer distances, you should probably look for an adjustable scope that goes up to 9x magnification. As well, if you plan on shooting both close and long distances, adjustable rimfire rifle scopes are really the only way to go. Rimfire Scope Reviews Nikon Prostaff Target EFR 3-9×40 The old Nikon Prostaff Rimfire Classic 3-9×40 has long been one of the most popular rimfire scopes on the market, but recently, the company has improved upon the original with the new and improved Prostaff Target , which features the newest Nikon Precision Reticle. This reticle has extra fine crosshairs and a dot, a huge plus on a rimfire rifle as it ensures the crosshairs don’t interfere with your ability to see exactly where you’re shooting—great for those who planning on shooting targets at longer distances. Speaking of longer distances, the Extended Focusing Range means you’ll have no problem clearly and precisely focusing in on objects close by or hundreds of yards away. In fact, this Adjustable Objective is probably the main reason that the Target EFR stands head and shoulders above the older "Prostaff Rimfire Classic" . Due to this adjustable objective, you can view targets parallax free at only 10 yards. Adjusting the setting to whatever distance is as simple as can be, as the various distances are clearly marked by the ring. Basically all you have to do is turn the ring to the correct distance and your target will already be in focus. The scope also features multi-coated lenses, providing increased clarity, contrast and brightness. As well, like any good scope, it is fully waterproof, shockproof and fog-proof. Although it’s made specifically for the .22LR, it also fits air rifles as well, with many professional target shooters often using this exact model. With a price just under $200, if you’re looking for an excellent rimfire scope for target shooting, you definitely can’t go wrong with this one. Leupold VX-II 3-9×33 EFR If you’re looking for the ultimate in versatility and don’t mind paying a higher price for it, the Leupold VX-II is surely one of the best. This scope features an extended focusing range, meaning you can turn the front ring to adjust the parallax to anything from 10 yards to 10,000. Ok, while you won’t actually be able to shoot that far, the fact that you can adjust the parallax for any distance you want gives you the ability to shoot incredibly accurately at any distance—even 500 yards or more. There’s a huge difference in parallax correction even between 25 and 50 yards, so you can imagine the difference when you’re shooting at only 10 to 15 versus several hundred yards. Of course, this isn’t the only adjustable parallax scope out there, but it is likely one of the best due to its overall quality, durability and reliability. Leupold has a fantastic reputation for producing some truly world class optics and the VX-II Rimfire is no different. Like most other Leupold products, it features a lifetime warranty, which is transferable to the new owner should you ever decide to sell. Another reason it stands above the competition is that it’s one of the few rimfire scopes to feature fully multi-coated optics, ensuring it can stand up to the rigors of hunting. As well, this model features Leupold’s Fine Duplex reticle, considered by many to be one the best reticles on the market due to the fact that its crosshairs stand out even in less than favorable shooting conditions. Although you can expect to pay around $400 or more, there’s no doubt that this scope is worth the price. That being said, if you’re looking for something really top of the line, you may want to check out the VX-II Rimfire EFR CDS, which features a Custom Dial System that enables you to precisely adjust the scope to match your particular ballistics. Nikon P-Rimfire 2-7×32 When it comes to choosing the absolute best rimfire rifle scope, there are a number of serious contenders, but for the money, this outstanding Nikon scope is one of the top choices considering its price, versatility and overall quality. Like many others, it has a 50 yard fixed parallax setting, making it a great choice for shooting at virtually any distance. However, what I really like about this one is that it allows you to perfectly adjust your shot for this distance. Many scopes on the market allow you to make ¼ inch click adjustments when dialing in your rifle, but oftentimes these adjustments are set at a distance of 100 yards or more, making it incredibly easy to overcorrect and sometimes nearly impossible to get the scope precisely dialed in at shorter distances. That’s not a problem with this scope though, as it features 1/4 inch adjustments set at 50 yards, enabling you to easily dial things in more precisely. The fact that this particular scope also comes with two elevation turrets means it works easily as well on both .17 and .22 caliber rifles, as you’ll have no problems precisely compensating for the bullet drop when shooting something like a .17HMR, especially if you use Nikon’s cool ‘Spot On’ ballistics app on your smartphone. To make it even easier, instead of the standard Nikoplex reticle you can always go with the Nikon BDC reticle, which features additional sight circles that help you to compensate for bullet drop at specified longer distances—no matter whether you’re shooting a standard Long Rifle or a Magnum. As well, with adjustable 2-7x magnification, it’s great for shooting targets of virtually any size at a wide range of distances. Combine this with the fact that it will only set you back around $150, and you’ve got the making of one outstanding rimfire rifle scope. In fact, the only reason it doesn’t score perfectly is that it doesn’t feature an Adjustable Objective. BSA Sweet 17 3-12×40 If you’re looking for a scope designed specifically for your .17 rimfire, the BSA Sweet 17 definitely hits the mark. The scope’s turret was designed specially to fit the .17HMR, making it super easy to change and to adjust for wind and elevation. In terms of magnification, this scope will give you a huge range, as the 12x magnification should be more than enough to shoot even small rodents like prairie dogs and gophers at distance. Still, if you want something even more powerful, BSA also makes a Sweet 17 6-18×40. The scope is easy to sight in and provides a crystal clear picture, making it simple to get quite tight groupings even at distances well over 250 yards depending on your rifle and choice of ammo. As well, it features an adjustable objective focus that can be set at anywhere from 10 yards to infinity. Durability also shouldn’t be an issue, as the scope comes with a lifetime limited warranty. For all of these features, you wouldn’t be wrong for expecting to pay upwards of several hundred dollars for this scope, and yet, it also just happens to be one of the least expensive on this list, as you can generally pick one up for under $100. A great quality .17 rimfire scope for an even better price is exactly what you’ll get with the BSA Sweet 17. That being said, there have been many reported complaints about reliability issues with this one, which is why it only gets 4 stars. Simmons . 22Mag 3- 9×32 If you’re in the market for a quality scope for your .22 rimfire, but don’t want to spend an arm and a leg on buying a high end model, this Simmons scope is definitely worth checking out. Although you can generally pick one up for less than $50, many people find that this scope works nearly as well as many that cost three to four times that price. Of course, it definitely can’t quite compare to a Leupold or Sightron, but that doesn’t mean it won’t still get the job done. Like many of the higher priced models, this scope features an Adjustable Objective, making sure that you’ll see a clear, focused view at any magnification level. The magnification and objective adjustments move smoothly and easily, while still staying precisely in place when you’re shooting. Another handy feature is the elevation and wind adjustment knobs, which can easily be turned even when you’re wearing gloves. Of course, there’s a cap you have to remove first, which prevents you from accidentally making adjustments as you move around. All of these features make the Simmons .22Mag rimfire scope an outstanding choice for those looking for something with a more than decent level of versatility for a great price. That being said, this model definitely isn’t without its faults, although that’s to be expected considering the price. Probably the biggest complaint concerns the lenses, as the fact that they are not multicoated means that they’re not able to let in nearly as much light as the more expensive fully multicoated scopes. What this means is that while you’ll probably still be able to make out your target in low light situations, such as dusk or dawn, you will probably struggle to be able to see the reticle properly. Final Words on Selecting the "Best Rimfire Scope" The fact remains that many people still consider using a scope on a rimfire rifle unnecessary, especially if that scope happens to cost several hundred dollars. However, the truth is that you’ll soon find you get even more enjoyment out of shooting your rimfire when it’s paired with a scope that’s even halfway decent. Considering that there were once only a few decent rimfire scopes on the market, the fact that there are now so many outstanding choices is obviously a great thing. However, as previously stated, finding the best rimfire scope for your particular rifle and your needs depends on a variety of factors, but hopefully after reading this guide, you at least have a better idea of where to start your search. Contents 5 Best Rimfire Scopes Rimfire vs. Centerfire Rifles The Importance of Parallax Choosing the Right Level of Magnification "Rimfire Scope Reviews" "Nikon Prostaff Target" EFR 3-9×40 Leupold VX-II 3-9×33 EFR Nikon P-Rimfire 2-7×32 BSA Sweet 17 3-12×40 Simmons . 22Mag 3- 9×32 Final Words on Selecting the Best Rimfire Scope

AR-15 Parts: Spares to Have On Hand

AR-15 Parts: Spares to Have On Hand

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379cb9b9912_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379cb9b9912_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Pistol grips used to just be pistol grips. Now you can adjust them for size, angle and storage capacity. What are the best AR-15 parts to have as backup in case something breaks? Here are Patrick Sweeney's top picks to keep your AR running. Breaks and Losses The spares you might be able to use in an emergency, or without extensive tools. A complete bolt, extra extractor, pin and o ring. Firing pin, cotter pin, gas rings. The spare parts you can use are those that might break (even if the odds are remote) and those that you might lose, in cleaning, disassembly or other maintenance. If you are cleaning your AR and have the bolt stripped, whatever you drop you will probably never see again. Well, if you are cleaning it in a bare concrete room maybe you’ll find it. But in grass, sand, dirt, water, weeds, etc. it will be gone, whatever it is/was. So we plan not just for breakage, but droppage as well. Extractor Extractors are not so expensive that you can’t afford a spare. A spare for each one, perhaps stored in the pistol grip. And while you’re at it, don’t be cheap. Your spare extractor should already be equipped with spring, internal buffer and D-Fender or O ring. “Hey, if my extractor breaks, I’ll just strip the spring and such out of the old one.” Uh-huh. And if you have dropped it? Have the new one fully equipped. As extra insurance, I’d put a spare extractor pin in the kit, maybe two. (Hey, if you drop one, you’ll drop another, right?) Related GunDigest Articles AR-15 Review: Get Tactical in 2015 AR-15 Review: Colt Expanse M4 Gallery: AR Sights and Lights Firing Pin They hardly ever break, but again, they aren’t expensive and they don’t take up much room,. Besides, you can always use the spare firing pin as a disassembly assistance tool. Oh, and the firing pin should have its own cotter pin, too, or maybe two. Gas Rings They are small, light, cheap, and easy to bend or lose. So you should have three spares. Why three? As I said, they are small, light, cheap and easy to bend. Spare Bolt The current tacti-cool fashion is to have a spare bolt someplace, typically inside the pistol grip. In the past I really wasn’t a fan of this. A bolt, fitted with rings, ejector, extractor, tested to your barrel, and stuffed in the pistol grip, costs you from $75 to $150. And in the past, bolts were not a problem. Well, we’ve been seeing enough broken bolts lately that having a spare bolt, ready to go, seems like a lot better idea than it did back then.

FSI Sniper 6-24x50mm Scope

What You Will Get Here Specifications Pros Our Remarks Specifications Item Weight 2.5 pounds Color Red/Blue/green Item model number ELADL-MR-PN-6736664 Editor Rating : 3.7 out of 5 star Check Latest Price & Reviews On Amazon Fsi sniper 6-24x50mm scope is a wonderful riflescope that is very durable and also provides you with reliable performance. It features maximum magnification power with a clear view which is 6 to 24x, and you can target on 300yd. it will give you perfect eye relief that will make you more comfortable to watch. You will also be comfortable with its size and weight that will adjust perfectly on your rifle and provide you the best performance. The 6x24x50 scope features multi-coated optics which will minimize the lenses reflections and will provide high contrast image; this multicoated comes with an advanced solution which will provide you with the maximum light transmission.  Fsi sniper 6-24x50mm scope will not let you miss any aim with its mil-dot reticle. It has three different color illumination which is red, blue and green; you can choose anyone for providing the best shooting performance with the accurate target. Fsi sniper 6-24x50mm scope adjusts on your rifle perfectly. To mount it strongly it has heavy duty ring mount, you will just adjust it with screws, and it has a protective extended sunshade. You can put into service or use this scope in any weather conditions or situation which will provide you the best performance always. The tube is nitrogen filled and completely sealed which ensures that it is shockproof, waterproof and fog proof. Pros Durable construction Maximum light transmission Very clear zoom image Mounting with heavy duty ring mount Protective extended sunshade Mil-dot with red/ blue/ green colors Shockproof, waterproof and fog proof Our Remarks Fsi scopes are wonderful tools for the shooters that we have found them with their nice price and quality. They will satisfy you with their durability and the performance. They are the high-quality rifle scopes that are shock resistance so they will be safe from any sudden shock. You can use these scopes in any weather because of their wonderful waterproof and fog proof features. To mount these scopes are very easy on the rifle with the ring mount and they also fit well and strong. These scopes have come with an excellent feature that is different colors mildot reticle which will help you to target your aim accurately. The colors are red, blue and green; you can change the colors with medium and high powers. Besides the scopes has multicoated optics which eliminate reflections and provide high light transmission. The scopes run on batteries, and it is easy to change the batteries. overall, they are wonderful rifle scopes for the shooters. "Check Latest Price" & Reviews On Amazon share share share share share

Canik TP9 SF Elite: 1,000 Round Review

Is the new, Turkish made, Canik TP9 SF Elite Turkish Dread or Turkish Delight? Those of you with a sweet tooth are probably familiar with the sugary confection called Turkish Delight. The sweet treat is a bit obscure in the US but internationally appreciated. A parallel with that treat can be drawn to today’s handgun. Not only in origin, but also in its need for importation and in the question concerning how the US market will react to a product that is well-received in other locales. Will we dive in, smile, and rub our bellies, or will we turn up our noses? Time will tell. Overview: What the heck is a Canik? You hear this question in gun shops across the US regularly. For some the name is quite familiar, but for others the buzz has only recently grown enough to register on their radar. It’s not uncommon for US companies like Century Arms to find a popular firearm and begin importing it into the US. Nor is it uncommon for those relationships to develop to a place warranting the platform be modified to better suit the US market. Think about Springfield’s decision to license the HS2000 line years ago. Or take a look at the Shotgun world and think of Stoeger, Huglo, Girsan, or even the Weatherby SA-08. Canik is a Turkish company that’s been known for CZ 75 type clones in the past, and more recently, striker fired polymer handguns. In fact, I’d say these polymer handguns are what they are best known for today. The polymer TP series has evolved a bit over the years, listening to the US market in particular. Currently Canik’s website lists the TP9SA, TP9SF, TP9SF Elite, TP9SF Elite-S, and TP9SFx. The difference between the TP9 SF Elite and Elite-S is a safety at the rear of the trigger guard on the S model. The TP9SFx model targeting the competition scene is the most recent addition in Canik’s line up. Let’s take a look at the recently released TP9 SF Elite— the gun that Canik is positioning as their flagship model. Features Notably, the Elite features a slide that’s been Cerakoted over a phosphate finish, which should provide durability— protecting against the elements. Indeed, my test subject has worn well. An improved single action trigger. A match grade barrel and Warren Tactical Sights. A pic rail. A loaded chamber indicator. A (goofy looking) striker status indicator. A (almost industry standard) reversible magazine catch. MecGar type mags. Ambi Slide Stop/Release Fit & Finish When you pick up the handgun, those of you that have prejudice or skepticism concerning handguns without name recognition will likely feel some cognitive dissidence. The gun gives off a quality first impression. The finish is well executed and several components typically made of polymer on other handguns in this category are made of metal on the Elite. You’ll notice the sights and think “I wouldn’t have to change those immediately.” By the way, that’s not only a good thing because of cost savings, but also because newer handguns often lag behind in after market support. Note: Folks around the range have been reporting installing M&P front sights and Glock rear sights on their TP9 SF models with success. I have no personal experience with this and am unaware of whether this works with the Elite models or not. Shooting Characteristics The grip on the Elite is farther forward than most competing polymer handguns. This allows for a higher than usual grip with a natural beavertail feel. The perceived recoil for this piece is notably soft— providing for quick follow up shots. For me, the gun pointed quite naturally and its short reset single action trigger was easy to become accustomed to. Overall, it’s a pleasure to use to ring steel at the range. Reliability Century advertises 60,000 rounds without failure. They may, in fact, have a test model with those numbers, but that wasn’t my experience. I had one FTE and one double feed in the first 300 rounds. However, after those failures, I had no other failures (beyond the one I purposefully induced). As the title suggests, I shot 1,000 rounds. The ejection pattern early on was erratic but seemed to normalize over time. However, though I didn’t continue getting brass in the face or to the body, the ejection did seem soft with shorter than standard throw. This may be no issue since the gun seemed to work well after those initial foibles, but I’d be comforted by a stronger extractor. Target Ammo Used: 124 grain Armscor 115 grain Winchester White Box 147 grain Remigton UMC 115 grain Blazer Brass 115 grain Federal (Aluminum case) Defensive Ammo Test Day 1: 124 grain Federal HST 124 grain Speer Gold Dot Defesive Ammo Test Day 2: 124 grain Remington HTP 124 grain Golden Saber (added to the day 1 options) Accuracy The gun’s accuracy seemed to be slightly above average for the type and definitely enough to be considered “combat accurate.” It’s not difficult at all to achieve palm sized groups off hand at defensive distances. You don’t even have to use Andre the Giant sized palms to say so. Dinging my 8″ steel circle from Shoot Steel at 25 yds was quite manageable as well. Durability Over the first 1,000 rounds, the gun has seen a lot of North Carolina red clay and quite a bit of sweat, and the finish has held up well. A thousand rounds isn’t really enough to test the longevity of internal components, but it’s a significant test nonetheless. There are no concerning internal wear indicators yet. Dimensions Barrel 4.19″ Overall Length 7.28″ Height 5.27″ Width 1.45″ Weight 1.77 lbs. unloaded Capacity 15+1 Summary The gun is a joy to shoot and offers a lot of options at a value price point. I have a sample size of one, and time will tell if enough vendors pick it up to allow for robust aftermarket support. How widely the TP9 SF Elite is adopted will likely be determined by two questions. Can Canik maintain quality control as demand increases? How well will Century deal with any initial growing pains and/or customer service issues? If small concerns are answered in a timely way, this gun has the potential to be a phenomenal success. The Good Tons of features and really pleasant shooting characteristics at a very affordable price. An attractive overall design from my perspective. The Bad Questionable aftermarket support and potential for growing pains if the product becomes a runaway success. Smallish magwell. Soft ejection. Over-stated branding and striker indicator. Still, at this price point, those negatives are pretty picky. Take Aways This gun is too large for the average user to consistently carry, but may be attractive to those who favor carrying full-sized guns as this will prove a bit more concealable than a G17 or standard M&P. So what the heck is a Canik? Perhaps it’s a magic word used to describe a sweet international shooting treat that will prove quite easy for those in the US to digest. Perhaps.

Summary

Manufactured by O. F. Mossberg & Sons, Mossberg 500 is a series of pump-action shotguns, very much treasured for their reliability and value.